The internet is full of relationship advice. As per research, understanding is the trait that helps couples to stick by each other. However, if you are seeking advice how to stay in long-lasting love then no one else would be better advisor than these couples who have been together since high-school. They have seen all ups and downs in the relationship and have gone through all storms together successfully.

The New York Times have interviewed some couples who have been together since they were teenagers. You can read their expert advice to make your relationship better.

Mary Isenstein, 80, and Len Isenstein, 82 — Dallas, TX

Mary and Len met at a party when she was twelve and he was fourteen. They were married on July 1, 1957, at ages twenty and twenty-three.

Their best advice: “You just got to understand each other and accept weaknesses even if they drive you crazy,” Ms. Isenstein said. “It’s important to have similar interest. Marriage is a two-way street. You have to be in it together. Otherwise, it doesn’t work.”

Gina Desiderio Edmison, 36, and Joshua Edmison, 35 — Ellicott City, MD

Gina and Joshua met through mutual friends in their teens and were married when Joshua was 25 and Gina was 24. They’ve dealt with some very serious issues, including infertility, but they stayed strong through their struggle.

“At the end of the day, it’s hard,” said Mr. Edmison of marriage. “People want or expect it to be easy. By hard, I mean really hard. There are dark times. There were weeks where we didn’t talk or we were not connecting. But since we’re both stubborn and goal-oriented people, we don’t quit. It would be easy to quit. You need to work through the adversity.”

Andi Farmer, 51, and Mark Farmer, 52 — Gainesville, GA

Andi and Mark met in sixth grade (!!!) but didn’t start dating until they were sophomores in high school. They married in 1986 when Andi was twenty-one and Mark was twenty-two.

Their advice? “Communication,” said Ms. Farmer. “If you don’t say what’s bothering you, it won’t get better. You also can’t just say what’s bothering you and what’s bad. You have to say what’s good, too. You also have to make sure to pay attention to your relationship and not take the other person for granted.”

Lindsey Grays, 29, and Alexander Grays, 29 — Seattle, WA

Lindsay and Alex met in tenth-grade world history class, and it was love at first sight. They were married in 2016 when they were both 28. They broke up when they were away from each other in college, but it didn’t take long for them to reunite once they returned home.

Lindsay’s best advice: “Say ‘sorry’ and mean it. Do something nice.”

Anna Popp, 50, and Daniel Popp, 50 — Plano, TX

Anna and Daniel were introduced by the head of their synagogue’s youth group when they were in high school. The rest is history! They married in 1989 when they were both jut twenty-two years old.

Being together for so long has undeniable advantages. “We helped mold each other into more and more of what we wanted in a partner,” said Mr. Popp. “That set the foundation for us to stick together the whole way.”

“It’s a partnership,” said Mrs. Popp. “When you really feel like you are in this together, it doesn’t matter what obstacle comes your way. We always try to solve them together.”

Shanti Yetish, 24, and Joshua Hunt, 25 — New York, NY

Shanti and Joshua met on their high school wrestling team during their junior year. (Shanti was the only girl on the team for most of high school.) They were engaged in 2015 and plan to marry in September of 2017.

College proved to be a challenging time for the young couple. Ms. Yetish attended Rutgers University and Mr. Hunt stayed home in Teaneck, NJ, attended community college and helped take care of Ms. Yetish’s ailing mother. Ms. Yetish saw many long-distance couples breaking up around her while at school, but she realized her and Mr. Hunt’s relationship was different.

Their advice is simple, yet poignant: “Patience, and understanding where the other person is coming from,” said Ms. Yetish.

“Be honest with each other,” Mr. Hunt said.

Sara Hasson, 36, and Laurence Hasson, 36 — Bronx, NY

Sara and Laurence met in the senior class play, Peter Pan. She played Wendy. He played Tinker Bell.

They married in 2003 when they were both twenty-three.

The advice they followed is inherited: “Someone gave me advice: Never go to bed angry,” said Mr. Hasson. “I think we really make an effort to try and hash things out when we’re angry.”

Paula Mantell, 66, and Michael Mantell, 67 — San Diego, CA

Paula and Michael met when she accidentally stepped on the back of his shoe in the hallway of West Orange Mountain High School. They married in 1971 — she was twenty-one, he was twenty-two.

There are several key aspects to maintaining the health of their relationship: “We solve problems together,” said Mr. Mantell. “It’s also having enormous trust and having an emotional connection and passion. We still have a gratifying sex life. We don’t have contempt and we never stonewall. We also don’t get offensive with each other.”

Their advice? “Always turn toward each other, and never ignore each other’s emotional needs.”

Now take your warmed heart and go read the whole article.

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